Don't We Already Do Inclusion? 100 Ideas for Improving Inclusive Schools

$24.00
SKU:
pb903
Author:
Paula Kluth
Copyright:
2013
Paperback:
141 pages
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How to Use This Book

Don't We Already Do Inclusion? 100 Ideas for Improving Inclusive Schools is designed to be used as a tool for evaluation, discussion, and reflection. It has four sections so that those in different roles can focus on strategies most critical to their daily work or experience. The first section, 'Classroom', contains ideas that will most likely be implemented by educators. Many of these solutions are related to curriculum, instruction and classroom management. The second section is 'School'. Ideas range from how to use spaces in the building to how to encourage collaboration to how to distribute resources. 'District' is the third section and features suggestions for sustaining change and creating a message that is consistent from building to building. The final twenty-five ideas are housed in the 'Community' section and pertain to ideas that can be implemented by almost anyone concerned about inclusive schools, including families, students, and local organizations. p.17-18

Reviews

Paula Kluth has done it again! A lively, practical and engaging how-to book on creating inclusion. Her focus is on all of us, teachers, staff, principals, district and community members, reminding us that inclusion, as with all social justice, is about joint action and commitment. Tons of practical ideas and examples presented in her inimitable style. Hurrah! --Anne M. Donnellan, Ph.D., Director of the University of San Diego Autism Institute; Professor Emerita, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Paula Kluth's enthusiasm is contagious and the structure of her new book is revolutionary. --Barbara Buswell, Executive Director, PEAK Parent Center, Colorado

Implementation science at its best. Paula Kluth reminds us of the importance of regularly revisiting our mission to create schools where everyone belongs. --Mary C. Schuh, Ph.D., National Center on Inclusive Education, Institute on Disability, University of New Hampshire